room & board sofa

Room & Board Sofa

Historical Examples I fought against it, fought to remain in that room and go on reading. Astounding Stories of Super-Science September 1930 Various After supper and a pipe in the steward’s room Jim climbed the long road to the dam. Still Jim Honor Willsie Morrow When he awoke, he found that the room was in darkness; it must have been night for several hours. Murder Point Coningsby Dawson It caused her a fresh burst of grief when she reached her own room. Deerbrook Harriet Martineau Hugh strode about the room in obvious perturbation, his eyes bent on the ground. A Son of Hagar Sir Hall Caine
room & board sofa 1

Room & Board Sofa

Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay offer two astonishing performances in what is one of the best and most intelligent representations of Plato’s Cave that I remember seeing (and I love the scope of its philosophical ambitions), told from the point of view of a child who has never seen the world beyond a room. Carlos Magalhães Super Reviewer For those who aren’t aware of Brie Larson’s previous work, you should know that she is truly an amazing talent. Her 2013 film “Short Term 12,” is a prime example of a past Oscar snub, and a harrowing and heartfelt film that deserves so much more attention than it got. Luckily Larson was aptly awarded for her work in this indie jewel, based on the Emma Donohue novel of the same name. Mostly set in a single room, the story follows a young mother and her son (who only knows the inside of a room). His mother teaches him about the outside world and the horrifying circumstances that have led to the pair’s current fate Read more at bluefairyblog.com Spencer S. Super Reviewer Boasting exemplary performances by the entire cast, Room is simply the best movie ever about the complex and loving relationship between a mother and her son, but particularly while that relationship is in dangerous straits. Best. Ever. As well there’s also a quick nod to the relationship between a mother and her own mother worth noting. Not simply quality filmmaking, but my pick for Best Picture of this year. Kevin M. Williams Super Reviewer Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay really carry this movie as mother and son who are imprisoned in a garden shed for seven (and five) years (respectively). Joy’s days are spent creating as normal of a childhood as she can for her son Jack – full of daydreams and exercise and crafts – so that at night when Old Nick comes for his conjugal visit, Jack would never think that hiding in the wardrobe is out of the ordinary. Now that he has turned five years old, Joy deems him old enough to learn the truth and plan their escape. And what a riveting escape it is. I’ve laughed at movies, cried at movies, jumped out of my seat and yelped at movies, but never has my heart raced so fast at a movie as when Jack struggles to disentangle himself from the carpet and scrabbles out of this moving, rumbling behemoth into a loud, populated, alien world he has never seen, much less imagined before. Nine-year-old Jacob Tremblay is so utterly natural as Jack, expressing shades of joy, anger, amusement, disgust, doubt, fear, and working that raggedy mop of hair to boot. My favorite moment is when Joy makes Jack repeatedly practice unrolling from the rug, and a disheveled, out-of-breath Jack tumbles out and spouts, “I hate you!” There is such power in his vehemence. Brie Larson is pretty dang good, infusing this young abuse victim with motherly patience and motherly ferocity, but I suppose she was good in an expected way. I expected a performance of this character to be this way, so I didn’t see any surprising distinctions. In fact, the post-Room scenes with the reporter or fighting with her mom seem a bit inorganic, both in script and acting. There isn’t enough nuance about Joy’s PTSD; all the dialogue is too on-the-nose, so both Larson and Joan Allen end up just yelling in one note. There are some weird must-happens in the story, of course. Old Nick must either be “kind” or dumb enough to not abuse his child begat from abuse, to not look inside the rug to confirm his child’s death, to not wrestle his child back into the truck after his escape attempt, to not go home right away to punish his prisoner-wife. I mean, the audience probably wouldn’t be able to handle more atrocity, but I wanted at least some background on what kind of abuser he is and what happens to him after the news broke. I know it’s not his story, nor would a real life person like him deserve more consideration, but for a fictional character, he needs some grounding traits. What would compel the reporter to ask Joy why she didn’t just have Old Nick take baby Jack to a hospital so that he may have a normal life? That would take an inordinate amount of trust in the abuser. And what if the rug were placed so that it would roll INTO the truckbed wall? And wouldn’t Joy’s friends have been affected by her disappearance and be interested/happy to know that she made it out alive? Alice Shen Super Reviewer View All Audience Reviews
room & board sofa 2

Room & Board Sofa

Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay offer two astonishing performances in what is one of the best and most intelligent representations of Plato’s Cave that I remember seeing (and I love the scope of its philosophical ambitions), told from the point of view of a child who has never seen the world beyond a room. Carlos Magalhães Super Reviewer For those who aren’t aware of Brie Larson’s previous work, you should know that she is truly an amazing talent. Her 2013 film “Short Term 12,” is a prime example of a past Oscar snub, and a harrowing and heartfelt film that deserves so much more attention than it got. Luckily Larson was aptly awarded for her work in this indie jewel, based on the Emma Donohue novel of the same name. Mostly set in a single room, the story follows a young mother and her son (who only knows the inside of a room). His mother teaches him about the outside world and the horrifying circumstances that have led to the pair’s current fate Read more at bluefairyblog.com Spencer S. Super Reviewer Boasting exemplary performances by the entire cast, Room is simply the best movie ever about the complex and loving relationship between a mother and her son, but particularly while that relationship is in dangerous straits. Best. Ever. As well there’s also a quick nod to the relationship between a mother and her own mother worth noting. Not simply quality filmmaking, but my pick for Best Picture of this year. Kevin M. Williams Super Reviewer Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay really carry this movie as mother and son who are imprisoned in a garden shed for seven (and five) years (respectively). Joy’s days are spent creating as normal of a childhood as she can for her son Jack – full of daydreams and exercise and crafts – so that at night when Old Nick comes for his conjugal visit, Jack would never think that hiding in the wardrobe is out of the ordinary. Now that he has turned five years old, Joy deems him old enough to learn the truth and plan their escape. And what a riveting escape it is. I’ve laughed at movies, cried at movies, jumped out of my seat and yelped at movies, but never has my heart raced so fast at a movie as when Jack struggles to disentangle himself from the carpet and scrabbles out of this moving, rumbling behemoth into a loud, populated, alien world he has never seen, much less imagined before. Nine-year-old Jacob Tremblay is so utterly natural as Jack, expressing shades of joy, anger, amusement, disgust, doubt, fear, and working that raggedy mop of hair to boot. My favorite moment is when Joy makes Jack repeatedly practice unrolling from the rug, and a disheveled, out-of-breath Jack tumbles out and spouts, “I hate you!” There is such power in his vehemence. Brie Larson is pretty dang good, infusing this young abuse victim with motherly patience and motherly ferocity, but I suppose she was good in an expected way. I expected a performance of this character to be this way, so I didn’t see any surprising distinctions. In fact, the post-Room scenes with the reporter or fighting with her mom seem a bit inorganic, both in script and acting. There isn’t enough nuance about Joy’s PTSD; all the dialogue is too on-the-nose, so both Larson and Joan Allen end up just yelling in one note. There are some weird must-happens in the story, of course. Old Nick must either be “kind” or dumb enough to not abuse his child begat from abuse, to not look inside the rug to confirm his child’s death, to not wrestle his child back into the truck after his escape attempt, to not go home right away to punish his prisoner-wife. I mean, the audience probably wouldn’t be able to handle more atrocity, but I wanted at least some background on what kind of abuser he is and what happens to him after the news broke. I know it’s not his story, nor would a real life person like him deserve more consideration, but for a fictional character, he needs some grounding traits. What would compel the reporter to ask Joy why she didn’t just have Old Nick take baby Jack to a hospital so that he may have a normal life? That would take an inordinate amount of trust in the abuser. And what if the rug were placed so that it would roll INTO the truckbed wall? And wouldn’t Joy’s friends have been affected by her disappearance and be interested/happy to know that she made it out alive? Alice Shen Super Reviewer

Room & Board Sofa

Room & Board Sofa
Room & Board Sofa
Room & Board Sofa
Room & Board Sofa

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