bay window sofa

Bay Window Sofa

Whether you choose building a nook  with a cozy window seat or moving a sofa to the window for creating a perfect spot for reading, bay window decorating enrich your interior design and create pleasant and light room decor. Dining furniture and home office furniture look great in a bay window nook. A game table with chairs or a decorative vase with lavish window curtains add charm to bay window designs, beautifying your home interiors.
bay window sofa 1

Bay Window Sofa

Divine sun filled windows with views are the perfect places to host a selection of cushions, a tray for your beverage, a soft throw and maybe a place to keep your books. By filling the recess of a window, you can extend the comfortable seating places in your home. Different decorative styles and shapes can enhance the comfort level and look of a window. The bay windows extending outwards from the house’s facade will add a charming character to both the interior and exterior of the building if the window seat is designed to complete the overall architecture and interior design style. Take a look at the 36 Cozy Window Seats and Bay Windows With a View and let us know which style suits you best and which window seat you could accommodate in your living, dining, bedroom or children’s room.
bay window sofa 2

Bay Window Sofa

Skillful bay window decorating ideas are a nice way to emphasize your house architectural features and add charming details to the room. Love seats and sofas, decorative pillows, cushions, attractive window curtains and comfortable window coverings, built-in window seats, house plants or tables are wonderful items for creating gorgeous interior design. Bay window curtains and chairs in neutral colors, classic interior design ideas
bay window sofa 3

Bay Window Sofa

Bays with window seats – Bay windows are very common in British homes, particularly Victorian, Edwardian and 1930s ones, and there are many ways to dress them, depending on the shape of the bay and the window size. A built-in window seat paired with Roman blinds offers comfort in style. Mix and match prints and plains for your blinds, upholstery and cushions to create that perfect spot to watch the world go by.
bay window sofa 4

Bay Window Sofa

The bay window can become a dramatic centerpiece, offering a focal point for functional and pleasant interior design. The bay window in your room can become your favorite place with a seating or dining furniture, or create a lovely home office your have been thinking about with a breath taking view and lots of natural light.
bay window sofa 5

Bay Window Sofa

Make a feature of a window – Bay windows, and window nooks in particular, are a perfect way to create additional seating while maximising floor space. Custom-made window seats can elongate or widen the room and, when paired with additional ottomans or chairs, they allow for more seating possibilities. If you have a similar setup in your house, consider building a banquette, add some storage underneath, a plush seat topper and some colourful cushions for an instant cosy corner where you can retreat and simply watch the world go by.
bay window sofa 6

Bay Window Sofa

Kristen DockeryI really want one of these bay windows in my dream home. I think that it would be so relaxing and so fun to have for my kids. I think that this would encourage them to read and I think that it would help them like to read for fun. I can’t wait to have a beautiful home and be able to have everything I have ever wanted in a home.NPGreenLovely photos! Definitely feeling inspired to make my own reading nook now. Unfortunately, I am renting my place, so most of these ideas, although looking stunning, can’t be implemented as it is forbidden to alternate the flat (according to my tenancy agreement). I will have to be creative, maybe buy a cosy sofa and place it near a window. Will also have to choose the right clean window with lots of sunlight and a nice view of London… I think, I got carried away a bit.
bay window sofa 7

Bay Window Sofa

Step 6: Building the Window Seat TopShow All Items The top of the window seat is comprised of 4 pieces of 3/4″ plywood with a 1 1/2″ strip of trim along the front edge.  Pic 2 shows the shape of the pieces.  I began by cutting the rear piece which is 5″ wide with 45° angles on each end.  After a bit of trial and error, I found 5″ to be sufficiently wide to allow the lid to rest against the window and remain open.  This piece could be wider, but not much narrower or the lid will fall down all the time. Next I measured the distance from the front edge of the 5″ piece to the front of the box to get the width of the lid.  Since the piano hinge requires almost 3/16″ space I cut the lid to 19″ which was the actual distance measured.  This gave me 3/16″ overhang on the front of the box when the hinge was installed.  I chose to make one large lid, however, you could easily make two.  Alternatively, you could also make a solid top and doors on the front.  In this case, I made one lid which extended to the center line of the outside 2x4s.  In this way, the side edges of the lid rest on the 2×4 for support.  The lid measures 19″ x 51″.   Before you glue & nail the 5″ back piece in place, it’s much easier to go ahead and attach the lid to it.  This is a job you don’t want to do from inside the box.  Picture 3 shows how a piano hinge is attached.  A piano hinge is a long continuous hinge which is very strong and a perfect solution for this project.  PIano hinges commonly come in 30″ and 48″ versions and 48″ would have done the job.  I chose instead to use two 30″ hinges so the entire gap would be filled.  This was easier than mortising a space for the 48″ hinge.  Piano hinges can be cut to the desired length using a hacksaw or portable grinder.  The hinges I used have sides that are 3/4″ wide so I mounted them flush with the bottom of the 3/4″ plywood.  In picture 4 you see that the hinges protrude a small bit but it’s not noticeable when the rug in laying on top of it.   With the 2 pieces hinged together, there’s a couple things that need to be done before permanently attaching them to the box.  First is to mark out and cut the 2 smaller side pieces.  This is most easily accomplished with the lid & back piece in place so you can measure size.  Leave a 1/16″ gap between the lid and the side pieces in case the wood expands.  Plywood doesn’t move much but a little gap is needed.  Once the side pieces are cut, the second thing is to attach the 1 1/2″ trim to the front of the lid and 2 side pieces as in picture 5.  Some wood glue and nails is sufficient.   Now put it all together with some Liquid Nails and some solid nails.  Lay down a bead of Liquid Nails on the 2x4s which are under the 5″ back piece and nail it in place.  Then do the same with the 2 side pieces.  Make sure to avoid getting the adhesive under the lid –especially when positioning & nailing the side pieces.  The last picture is the 3/4″ cove molding along the top edge of window seat.  I like cove molding here but you could also use quarter round or a larger piece of trim.   With everything in place it’s time to touch up the finish by filling nails holes with wood putty, caulking the seams and giving it another coat of paint.  
bay window sofa 8

Bay window is a generic term for all protruding window constructions, regardless of height. The most common inside angles are 90, 135 and 150 degrees, though triangular bays formed of two windows set at 120 degrees may be found.
bay window sofa 9

The top of the window seat is comprised of 4 pieces of 3/4″ plywood with a 1 1/2″ strip of trim along the front edge.  Pic 2 shows the shape of the pieces.  I began by cutting the rear piece which is 5″ wide with 45° angles on each end.  After a bit of trial and error, I found 5″ to be sufficiently wide to allow the lid to rest against the window and remain open.  This piece could be wider, but not much narrower or the lid will fall down all the time. Next I measured the distance from the front edge of the 5″ piece to the front of the box to get the width of the lid.  Since the piano hinge requires almost 3/16″ space I cut the lid to 19″ which was the actual distance measured.  This gave me 3/16″ overhang on the front of the box when the hinge was installed.  I chose to make one large lid, however, you could easily make two.  Alternatively, you could also make a solid top and doors on the front.  In this case, I made one lid which extended to the center line of the outside 2x4s.  In this way, the side edges of the lid rest on the 2×4 for support.  The lid measures 19″ x 51″.   Before you glue & nail the 5″ back piece in place, it’s much easier to go ahead and attach the lid to it.  This is a job you don’t want to do from inside the box.  Picture 3 shows how a piano hinge is attached.  A piano hinge is a long continuous hinge which is very strong and a perfect solution for this project.  PIano hinges commonly come in 30″ and 48″ versions and 48″ would have done the job.  I chose instead to use two 30″ hinges so the entire gap would be filled.  This was easier than mortising a space for the 48″ hinge.  Piano hinges can be cut to the desired length using a hacksaw or portable grinder.  The hinges I used have sides that are 3/4″ wide so I mounted them flush with the bottom of the 3/4″ plywood.  In picture 4 you see that the hinges protrude a small bit but it’s not noticeable when the rug in laying on top of it.   With the 2 pieces hinged together, there’s a couple things that need to be done before permanently attaching them to the box.  First is to mark out and cut the 2 smaller side pieces.  This is most easily accomplished with the lid & back piece in place so you can measure size.  Leave a 1/16″ gap between the lid and the side pieces in case the wood expands.  Plywood doesn’t move much but a little gap is needed.  Once the side pieces are cut, the second thing is to attach the 1 1/2″ trim to the front of the lid and 2 side pieces as in picture 5.  Some wood glue and nails is sufficient.   Now put it all together with some Liquid Nails and some solid nails.  Lay down a bead of Liquid Nails on the 2x4s which are under the 5″ back piece and nail it in place.  Then do the same with the 2 side pieces.  Make sure to avoid getting the adhesive under the lid –especially when positioning & nailing the side pieces.  The last picture is the 3/4″ cove molding along the top edge of window seat.  I like cove molding here but you could also use quarter round or a larger piece of trim.   With everything in place it’s time to touch up the finish by filling nails holes with wood putty, caulking the seams and giving it another coat of paint.  

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